&c.

Opinions expressed here are my own, except when they're someone else's. They do not reflect any position of the U.S. Government or the Peace Corps, but sometimes they should.
~ Thursday, December 26 ~
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skeletales:

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius that gives off the illusion of an underwater waterfall at the southwestern tip of the island. The visually deceiving impression, created in the water due to the runoff of sand and silt deposits, is especially effective and breathtaking in aerial shots. In fact, the illusion can even be seen on Google Maps.

skeletales:

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius that gives off the illusion of an underwater waterfall at the southwestern tip of the island. The visually deceiving impression, created in the water due to the runoff of sand and silt deposits, is especially effective and breathtaking in aerial shots. In fact, the illusion can even be seen on Google Maps.


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~ Monday, December 23 ~
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gallifrey-feels:

Tumblr

Tumblr!

(Source: adfoc.us)


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anoteinpink:

Misandrist Animals - by Katie W.

(with illustrations by me!)


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blan44 said: Is, or isn't, Robin a Bi-sexual?

itswalky:

Robin is primarily attracted to dudes but finds some ladies attractive.  She identifies more strongly with being attracted to dudes, and so she feels “bisexual” doesn’t really describe herself well.  She’s more comfortable with “generally kinda undefinably queer.”

I might borrow that for myself.

Tags: generally kinda undefinably queer
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~ Saturday, December 21 ~
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~ Thursday, December 12 ~
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ironbloodaika said: Have you ever played Mass Effect? The reason I ask is because Jacob reminds me a lot of a character named Jacob Taylor from ME2. I'm sure it's just a coincidence though and I'm just looking too closely at things, but I still thought I should ask. XD

itswalky:

I haven’t played things which aren’t Mario.

What, because they’re both black? *eyebrow*

Tags: yes I can raise just one eyebrow be jealous if you like
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~ Tuesday, December 3 ~
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abandonedography:

The destruction from Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines - Erik de Castro

I’ve walked those streets. I’ve eaten McDonald’s in that city, slept there, caught a cold there. Bought gifts for friends. Interacted with so many people who are now either dead or homeless. For the first time, I’m looking at an international tragedy and knowing how those people lived and understanding the extent of the devastation.


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~ Monday, December 2 ~
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…some reviewers see an English-language anthology of postcolonial-themed fiction as somehow “ironic.” I don’t see anything ironic about it. English is a global language because of colonialism. How is it ironic to address postcolonial issues in English—a language of oppression and resistance, of loss and survival—a postcolonial language?
It seems to me that by criticizing the use of English for the anthology, these reviewers are pointing toward a lack of authenticity among the writers. They want some sort of “real” postcolonial expression, and to them, the “real thing” can’t be expressed in English. Of course, as Fabio says, there is no one-to-one correspondence between languages, and so there will always be things a language other than English could express more fully, carrying all kinds of connotations missing from English, carrying scents and varieties of weather—in fact, carrying worlds. But the existence of these worlds does not erase the world which English expresses with terrible accuracy: a postcolonial world in which many people (myself among them) who wish desperately that they could write in another language, in their “own” language, cannot do it.

There is also, of course, the question of the many varieties of English. I like this question! This is a happy question! There are so many kinds of English now that we really should be talking about Englishes. I call it a happy question because it focuses on people’s creativity rather than their misery and loss. As you say, quoting Charles—it’s about how people have made English their own. That happens not only with mixtures like Singlish or Spanglish but with the way people use the language in different parts of the world, the words they choose, the new meanings they give them.

Sofia Samatar in Strange Horizons Articles: Different Frontiers: Taking Over English, by Benjanun Sriduangkaew

THIS is the reason I had so much ambivalence about teaching English in the Philippines. I was constantly being asked what the “right” way to say something in English was, the assumption being that since I’m an American, I have the authority to say. But the Philippines has its own very vibrant, interesting version of English that is perfectly suited to the local culture in a way that Standard English is not. I opted to answer such questions with, “Well, if you want to be understood by an American, you could say…”

But anyway, I just wish more people in Peace Corps and in America generally would acknowledge that English is not “our” language, and hasn’t been for a very long time.


~ Wednesday, November 27 ~
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bodypartss:

WTF

QUOKKA!

(Source: iraffiruse)


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~ Tuesday, November 26 ~
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